Mar 31

Endangered Species And Ecosystems

ecosystemTo save our environment is the primary responsibility of every one of us, and in order to save our environment, we have to make sure that all the species and animals on this planet must be saved. The reasons behind this are that many of these endangered species are important to sustain life on this planet. Some of these endangered species are an important part of the chain reaction that is important to save our ecosystem. We depend on different types of ecosystems to get food, fresh air,  and water. By polluting these ecosystems, we are actually gradually moving towards  the destruction of this planet. Cutting down the trees is the main cause for endangering the many important plant and animal species.

Causes of Endangered Species and Ecosystems
Industrialization has been the main cause of endangering the plant and animal species as well as ecosystems. Many of the animal species have already disappeared due to a lack of care, and every day we are threatening various other species by our continuous industrialization all over the world. Our planet is in danger at the moment, and every step towards industrialization is actually becoming the step towards destruction of this planet. The pollution caused by the industries also affected the animals living under the sea. It is not just the wildlife that is endangered at the moment, but the sea life is also in extreme danger. There are various causes for this process, but the results are the same, endangered species and ecosystems are increasing every day.

Why to Protect Endangered Species
Many plants as well as animals are important to develop medications, and research has revealed that almost half of the drugs prescribed by doctors are either made from the plants or animals. These animals and plants are not only working as the life savers, but these are also important for the growth of the pharmaceutical industry. Besides medications these species are also important for agricultural purposes also. At the moment, 90 percent of the food needed for the world has been fulfilled through plants; therefore, we have to protect all of these endangered species for our future generations.

How Endangered Species are Important for Our Ecosystems
The basics of any ecosystem are plants and animals, and these ecosystems are the key to sustaining life on this planet. Some of these ecosystems are ancient forests, grasslands, and coastal estuaries. These ecosystems are responsible to provide clean air, food, and water to the humans. Without these ecosystems, we cannot imagine life on this planet. When animal and plant species are in danger, that means our ecosystems that are essential for life are also in danger. Protecting our ecosystems by protecting these endangered species is the responsibility of everyone.
The endangered species and ecosystem are the major environmental issues today which need to be addressed accordingly if we want to keep our planet in a better condition. It becomes the responsibility of all people to protect our environment,and these endangered species.

Khavin, S is a freelance writer with a tremendous knowledge about environmental issues. No wonder he is actively engaged in environmental issues. Read his latest post about Jaguars.

Jun 22

Dire forecast of marine life catastrophe – San Francisco Chronicle

The world’s oceans are degenerating far faster than predicted and marine life is facing extinction due to a range of human impacts – from overfishing to climate change – a report compiled by international scientists warned Tuesday.

The cumulative impact of “severe individual stresses,” ranging from climate warming and sea-water acidification to widespread chemical pollution and overfishing, would threaten the marine environment with a catastrophe “unprecedented in human history.”

The conclusions were published by a panel of international scientists who reviewed recent research at a workshop at Oxford University in Britain. They will be presented to the United Nations in New York this week for discussions on reforming governance of the oceans.

The report warned that damage to marine life would harm its ability to support humans, and that entire ecosystems, such as coral reefs, could be lost in a generation. Coral deaths alone would be considered a mass extinction, according to study chief author Alex Rogers of Oxford University. A single bleaching event in 1998 killed one-sixth of the world’s tropical coral reefs.

Carl Lundin, director of global marine programs at the International Union for Conservation of Nature, which helped produce the report with the International Program on the State of the Ocean, pointed to deaths of 1,000-year-old coral in the Indian Ocean and called the situation “really unprecedented.”

Chemicals and plastics from daily life are also causing problems for sea creatures, the report said. Overall, the world’s oceans just can’t bounce back from problems – such as oil spills – as they used to, scientists said.

“Unless action is taken now, the consequences of our activities are at a high risk of causing, through the combined effects of climate change, overexploitation, pollution and habitat loss, the next globally significant extinction event in the ocean,” it said.

The marine scientists called for a range of urgent measures to cut carbon emissions, reduce overfishing, shut unsustainable fisheries, create protected areas in the seas and cut pollution.

“As we considered the cumulative effect of what humankind does to the ocean, the implications became far worse than we had individually realized,” Rogers said. “This is a very serious situation demanding unequivocal action at every level.”

A separate study released Monday provided the most detailed look yet of sea level rise from global warming. It found the world’s oceans have been rising significantly over the past century. The yearly rise is slightly less than one-tenth of an inch, but it adds up over decades. That study was published in this week’s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. This article appeared on page A – 4 of the San Francisco Chronicle