Apr 06

Multipure Continues to be The Best Home Water Filter

Multipure has proven once again that they are the best in home water filtration. The Multipure Aquadome and Aquaversa are certified by NSF newest standard, 401 to reduce even more contaminants from drinking water, including prescription drugs and OTC medications!

This is exciting news as we are becoming more aware of the drugs that are contaminating our water supply. Now you can drink you own tap water without the worry of contamination from these products.

This is even further proof that Multipure water filters are the best on the market today. Check the NSF Official site for all the awesome details on Multipure’s water filters. No other water filter reduces more contaminants. Guaranteed!

There has never been a better time to purchase your own Multipure water filter today. Visit www.indianawaterfilters.com and start drinking the safest water you can drink, right at your kitchen sink.

Nov 02

Fall Multipure Promotion!

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Multipure’s Autumn Opportunity Promotion
(Promotional Period: October 1, 2014 through December 31, 2014)

Multipure is offering a Branded Water Carafe and Glass for just the cost of shipping to customers who purchase any Multipure Drinking Water System at regular price! Or if you purchase any Drinking Water System Starter Kit at regular price and sign up as a new Distributor, you can receive the Branded Water Carafe and Glass absolutely FREE!

Promo Code: BWATERPROMO (will be mailed with order)
Free Multipure Water Carafe and Glass plus $10.00 S/H fee when purchasing any DWS

or

Promo Code: BWATERPROMO2 (will be mailed with order)
Free Multipure Water Carafe and Glass if you purchase any Drinking Water System Starter Kit and sign up as a new Distributor

(enter promo code at the checkout screen)

Jul 11

Summer Promo From Mutipure

GET A FREE Water Emergency Treatment System With Purchase of a Multipure Drinking Water System!

summer2-791x1024

From July 1st through September 30th, Multipure is offering an all-new Water Emergency Treatment (WET) System for just the cost of shipping to Customers who purchase any Multipure Drinking Water System at regular price! — Or if you purchase any Drinking Water System Starter Kit at regular price and sign up as a new Distributor, you can receive a WET System absolutely FREE! The WET System includes two Multipure EF8 solid carbon block filters as well as emergency water purification tablets and other essential equipment.

Promo Code: SA912PROMO (will be mailed with order)
Free WET System plus $10.00 S/H fee when purchasing any drinking water system.

OR

Promo Code: SA912PROMO2 (will be mailed with order)
Free WET System if you purchase any Drinking Water System Starter Kit
when you sign up as a new Distributor

(enter promo code at the checkout screen) visit Multipureusa.com to order

Promotion Details

1. Offer valid July 1, 2014 through September 30, 2014.
2. A Multipure Drinking Water System (DWS) is defined as an Aquamini, Aquadome, Aquaversa, Aquaperform, orAquaRO.
3. Multipure’s Aquasource whole-house system is included as a qualifying promotional purchase.
4. Customers may receive one (1) Water Emergency Treatment (WET) System (SKU# SA912) when they purchase any DWS at regular price.
5. The free SA912 must be requested at the time of purchase. No exceptions.
6. Customers who cancel their DWS or DWS Starter Kit order (at regular price) must also pay the full price for the SA912 or return the SA912.
7. Shipping and handling on the free SA912 is not included. The Customer must pay for the $10 shipping and handling at the time of purchase.
8. The SA912 is shipped with the DWS purchase and may not be shipped to a different address.
9. The SA912 promotion is available with Filtermania and Aquamania purchases.
10. This promotion is subject to change or may be discontinued at any time.

May 17

Multipure – a Factor in Breast Cancer Prevention

Sponsors of study advocate use of solid carbon block filters to limit exposure to breast cancer chemicals.

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Multipure Aquaversa and Solid Carbon Block Filter

Multipure Aquaversa and Solid Carbon Block Filter
(Has won Consumer Reports’ Award as Best
Under Sink Drinking Water for Third Year in 2014)

Las Vegas, NV (PRWEB) May 14, 2014

A new study published in the peer-reviewed journal,Environmental Health Perspectives, identifies key chemicals in the formation of breast cancer tumors. Sponsors of the study advocate methods to limit exposure – including the use of solid carbon block filters for drinking water. The study, New Exposure Biomarkers as Tools For Breast Cancer Epidemiology, Biomonitoring, and Prevention: A Systematic Approach Based on Animal Evidence, was jointly-conducted by scientists from theSilent Spring Institute and the Harvard School of Public Health. They identify 17 groups of commonly encountered carcinogenic chemicals linked to breast cancer, including benzene and butadiene (found in vehicle exhaust, tobacco smoke, or charred food), methylene chloride (found in cleaning solvents), flame retardants (found in treated furniture or rugs), stain-resistant textiles (found in furniture upholstery), and disinfection byproducts (found in drinking water). Among the preventative measures advised include limiting exposure to gasoline fumes and vehicle exhaust, avoiding flame-retardant and stain-resistant furniture, and using a solid carbon block filter to treat drinking water. Multipure’s Interim Vice President of Marketing and Certified Water Specialist, Kenton Jones, is proud that this study reaffirms Multipure’s core belief of better water for better health and better lives. “Multipure has always believed in helping people by helping them obtain cleaner, better water. For over forty years, we have worked to bring the best water filters and water treatment devices to the market, and our current solid carbon block filters are NSF-certified to reduce the broadest array of contaminants of health concern. Our filters are proven to reduce many of the contaminants listed in this study, including disinfection byproducts, benzene, and other carcinogens. I can’t stress enough how important it is for people to protect their water with a Multipure solid carbon block-based system.” Silent Spring Institute is an organization dedicated to identifying and breaking the links between environmental chemicals and breast cancer. The Harvard School of Public Health is an institute dedicated to the advancement of public health through research and education. Environmental Health Perspectives is a peer-reviewed research journal focused on the interrelationships between the environment and human health, published with support from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Founded in 1970, Multipure is an industry leader in the manufacture and distribution of drinking water systems and compressed solid carbon block filters. Headquartered in Las Vegas, Nevada, Multipure employs over 200 people, and is committed to being a company that provides the people of the world with the best quality drinking water at an affordable price. Multipure is a member of the Water Quality Association, the Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce, and the Better Business Bureau.

 

Jun 06

Multipure Aquaversa (MP750sb) Named #1 For Second Year In A Row!

Consumer Reports Best Water Filters – 2013

CR1Consumer Reports is my favorite magazine of its type, and I  trust them to give fair and unbiased  test results. In this June, 2013 edition they tested and reported on most common kitchen appliances and surprisingly, for the second year in a row, water filters!  Consumer Reports tells us that filtering tap water can save money and keep millions of plastic bottles out of landfills. This is especially important as most of these water bottles never make it to the recycling bins or the landfills, but end up in our waterways and oceans!

CR tested almost 40 water filters for their report covering such aspects as: how well they removed contaminants including lead removal, chloroform removal, flow rate, clogging, filter replacement and price.

Lead removal indicates the percentage of lead that was removed.

Chloroform removal rates the percentage of chloroform removed. A filter’s ability to remove chloroform predicts how well it will remove many organic compounds as well as byproducts created by disinfectants used by water systems.

Flow rate measures how long it takes to filter 1 gallon of water. The criteria for flow rate scores differently between different types of filters. Faucet-mount, countertop, and undersink models use the same criterion; carafes and reverse osmosis models each have their own.

Clogging measures how well the filter retains its flow rate over time and whether it stopped flowing completely before its claimed life span.

Prices shown are approximate retail.

CR tested carafes, countertop, faucet mounted, reverse osmosis, and under sink water filters.

Once again, the Multipure MP750sb (also known as the Aquaversa) rated best for under the sink water filters.  I highly recommend the Multipure line of products and this is the system that I have in my kitchen. For answers to abt questions or concerns you might have in regard to Multipure drinking water system, feel free to give me a call or visit my site: http://multipureusa.com/koakley

May 06

One Drop At A Time

waterdropIn beginning a new season, we are inclined to become introspective. We look at our daily lives and routines and evaluate in order to improve. You may wonder if you are doing enough to care for yourself, your fellow humans and the environment.

When looking for ways to live a more fulfilling and responsible life, it is easy to become overwhelmed. There are many facets of life on which one could focus; however, the thought of conquering everything at once can be daunting. A great solution to this is to begin with some small, simple things that involve daily activities. In reality, the small things that you do each day make the biggest impact overall. For example, here are three easy ways to save water, the world’s most precious resource. In doing so, you will be helping yourself, fellow humans and the environment, one drop at a time.

Time it: Every day, you do things that involve running a faucet for a period of time, whether it’s washing dishes or brushing your teeth. The mind can wander while the tap is running and valuable water is going down the drain. One way to get the job done effectively is to set a timer. If you know that the timer is going to go off, and you will have to shut off the sink at the sound of the alarm, you will be more cognizant of the amount of resources you use. Once you use a timer a few times, you will subconsciously become accustomed to using water in a timelier manner. This way, in addition to saving resources, you will also save time.

Install it: In doing a little research about water conservation devices, you might be surprised at how easy they are to install and implement into your daily routine. Water-saving showerheads use a fraction of the H2O that regular showerheads use, while still functioning efficiently. Once you have your high-efficiency shower head installed, you can save the wet stuff by simply showering normally. You will use less, therefore simultaneously saving money on your bills and helping our planet.

Drink it: Ironically, drinking water is a great way to conserve it. Use a filter to purify your tap water and opt to drink it instead of bottled water, soda or other beverages. Considering that water composes 75 percent of your body, it must be the healthiest thing you can drink. By drinking purified water from you tap, you are also reducing the amount that goes into manufacturing non-water beverages. Everyday, millions of gallons of precious H2O are used to manufacture soda. Make a resolution to limit or discontinue drinking packaged drinks and create a healthier Earth and a healthier you.

Water conservation is one of Ashley’s favorite topics to write about. If you’re looking for more information regarding water saving showerheads, please visit http://www.niagaraconservation.com/

May 06

Ways To Get Healthy That Are Also Good For The Environment

Ways To Get Healthy That Are Also Good For The Environment

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Two years ago, comedian Jeff Garlin wrote a book called My Footprint: Carrying the Weight of the World, describing his journey to becoming slimmer and more environmentally-conscious. Anyone who has seen the portly comedian on Curb Your Enthusiasm or any number of his movies and comedy specials knows that Garlin could stand to lose a few pounds. Garlin took it one step further though and tried to figure out how his food and life decisions impacted the environment. What he found out was that there was a connection between the two. With the help of a nutritionist and Ed Begley Jr., world-renowned environmentalist, Garlin is able to reduce his footprint, both figuratively and literally. The book presented an interesting argument, so let’s try to examine ways one can get healthier while helping the environment as well.

  • Eat more plants and fewer animals: Through countless documentaries like Forks over Knives and books like The Omnivore’s Dilemma, everyone knows that eating fewer animals is good for your overall health. Vegetarianism and veganism has been linked with lower incidences of heart disease, cancer, diabetes and countless other illnesses. The meat industry also costs our environment dearly. We use water, fertilizer and land to raise animals for food. These resources could be better used elsewhere. In addition, the animal waste produced in meat-producing farming often pollutes water sources and the air. By eating more plants and fewer animals, you’ll lower your cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure and your total carbon footprint.
  • Walk instead of drive: Garlin has one anecdote in his book where he rides public transportation in Los Angeles for the first time. Anyone who has ridden the bus knows the interesting characters you can meet. However, using public transportation can lower your carbon footprint as you’re emitting less pollution in the air than let’s say driving your SUV. However, if you can walk or ride your bike to your destination, that’s even better. The American Heart Association recommends at least thirty minutes of activity a day for optimal health, so you’re covered there; plus, you emitting no pollution in the air, which makes Mother Nature happy.
  • Try localized honey: Are you sniffling and sneezing a lot? You might want to try local honey. Honey has long been known as a natural remedy for allergies. In addition, buying local honey will help support an industry responsible for pollinating your fruits and vegetables. If you are really ambitious, you might want to try raising your own bees. It is a wonderful hobby that will afford you ample amounts of fresh honey as well as the satisfaction of knowing you’re helping the environment.

No matter who you are, you can start taking small steps towards a healthier you, and a healthier planet, today.

Alex White is a freelancer interested in writing about sustainability and environmental issues.

Apr 13

Uncovering Great Lakes Garbage Patch

Microplastics fro Great Lakes on Penny

A penny provides scale for the size of micro plastics being found in the Great Lakes ‘Garbage Patch.’ Credit: 5Gyres.

Until recently, my concept of a ‘garbage patch’ was of an area of ocean with large pieces of floating debris, the kind of stray fishing gear and trash from ships and shorelines that collect where currents form eddies far from view of most people.

Having seen my share of sea trash in 20,000+ miles of lake and ocean sailing and even untangled sheets of plastic and thick ropes from the propeller and rudder of my 37-foot sailboat, I was shocked to learn that the kind of garbage scientists are most concerned about is invisible to the naked eye. They’re finding tiny bits of plastic known as “micro-plastics” floating near the surface of the water in high concentrations. The particles are so small that a microscope is needed to even see them.

The scary news this week was about a garbage patch discovered in the Great Lakes last year. Although scientists have studied plastic pollution in the oceans since NOAA researchers discovered the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” in 1988, a team of scientists is conducting the first-of-its-kind research on the open water of the Great Lakes. One of the team members presented preliminary results of a study on the topic at meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Photo: Great Lakes Garbage Patch research team. Source: 5Gyres

The team of researchers studying the Great Lakes ‘Garbage Patch’ in 2012. Credit: 5Gyres.

I spoke with Lorena Rios-Mendoza, an environmental chemist at the University of Wisconsin-Superior, and found that the buzz was certainly justified. Her background includes studying plastic debris and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Pacific Garbage Patch and in the Southern Ocean. Now an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Superior, she has turned her attention to these same issues on the North American Great Lakes.

“I’m interested in learning more about what happens to persistent organic pollutants when they attach to the plastic particles,” Rios-Mendoza told me. She is now studying 110 fish samples to see if they have plastic debris in their guts and to learn more about what happens to POPs associated with the plastic pollution. She wonders whether the accidental consumption of tiny bits of plastic by fish might be a new source for toxins in the food chain.

Photo: Sampling plastic pollution on the Great Lakes. Source: 5Gyres.

Sam Mason (on right) collecting samples of plastic pollution aboard the “Niagara” on the Great Lakes. Credit: 5Gyres.

Rios-Mendoza is working with a team of researchers led by Sherri “Sam” Mason, a SUNY-Fredonia chemistry professor and researcher at the forefront of research on plastic pollution within freshwater ecosystems, including the Great Lakes. Mason is actually an atmospheric chemist, but she also has a passion for environmental sustainability. A few years ago, a colleague at Niagara University invited her to teach an environmental science course aboard the Flagship Niagara, a rebuilt version of a tall ship used during the War of 1812 that is now used for on-water education programs. Having lived near the shores of Lake Erie for over ten years, she had never been out on the lake, let alone a sailboat, before teaching the summer course. Mason’s time on the water inspired her to take up an entirely new area of research: studying plastic pollution in the Great Lakes.

Modeling herself after scientists like Rachel Carson who are committed to sharing relevant research, Mason found that studying and trying to raise awareness about plastic pollution in freshwater systems suited her. “This is a fantastic area for research because the information is much needed and relevant to the scientific community and to people concerned about the Great Lakes,” she told me.

Mason and Rios-Mendoza have been working in collaboration with the 5Gyres Institute, a research and education group studying garbage patches in five subtropical gyres in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Southern Oceans.

Photo: Microplastic pollution in Lake Erie. Source: 5Gyres

Tiny pieces of plastic pollution found while sampling in Lake Erie. Credit: 5Gyres.

The team of researchers studying the Great Lakes wasn’t surprised to find plastic pollution, especially in Lake Erie, the smallest (by volume) and shallowest of the five lakes. They did find something interesting when comparing their results to the research in oceans. The concentration of PAHs (polyaromatic hydrocarbons) in Lake Erie is twice as high as what is found in the world oceans. “This makes sense because the oceans are so much larger – there’s a dilution factor,” Rios-Mendoza said.

Something else the research team didn’t expect was the predominance of micro-plastic particles (less than 1 millimeter in diameter). In the world’s oceans, scientists have found higher percentages of debris in the 1-5 millimeter diameter size range as compared to the micro-plastics. Mason suspects that this is because of the larger ratio of shoreline to open water, creating an abrasive action to break down the plastic.

Photo: Sample of micro plastics from Lake Erie. Source: 5Gyres.

A sample taken from Lake Erie showing micro plastics less than 1 millimeter in size. Credit: 5Gyres.

They’re finding tiny, perfectly round beads of plastic in many of the samples, and this might hold another clue about the source of particles. “The cosmetics industry uses plastic micro-beads in soaps, toothpaste and other products. Because the products are not designed for ingestion, they don’t have to test for this. It’s completely unregulated and may be a significant source of micro-plastics finding their way into the environment,” she says.

Finding the sources of plastic pollution and getting a better idea of the degradation process is the subject of follow-up studies Mason and her team are working on.

More research is needed to compare the amount of plastic pollution from one lake to the next, but Rios-Mendoza explained to me that it takes more than two hours of towing the fine-mesh sampling net in Lake Superior to recover the amount of plastic in a 30-minute trawl from Lake Erie. The team plans to sample the St. Lawrence River and Lakes Erie, Michigan, and Ontario this summer, and as funding allows, to carry out more systematic studies of all five lakes.

How do plastics end up in oceans and now lakes? Well to begin with, we have become a throwaway society. We’re using and throwing away more and more plastics, sometimes after only using them once. The plastics are designed to last a long time, more than 500 years in some cases, Mason told me. In the U.S. alone, we consume “billions” of plastic bags and bottles. According to the 5Gyres website, only five percent of the plastics produced for things like water bottles, cups, utensils, toys and gadgets are recycled. “Roughly 50% is buried in landfills, some is remade into durable goods, and much of it remains unaccounted for, lost in the environment where it ultimately washes out to sea,” their website states.

Photo: fishing boats on Lake Erie. Source: Lisa Borre.

From the deck of a boat on Lake Erie, micro plastics are not visible in the water. Photo by Lisa Borre.

Plastic pollution is not only a problem in the water but along beaches and shorelines as well. Beaches in Hawaii were found to contain 50% sand and micro-plastics, Rios-Mendoza told me. The research team has not studied the amount of micro-plastics on Great Lakes beaches yet.

The Alliance for the Great Lakes leads an Adopt-a-Beach program to address the problem of beach pollution throughout the Great Lakes region. Mason participates in the Adopt-a-Beach program and says that her students are always surprised by how much trash they find on a beach that doesn’t look that bad at the outset. She is also leading a one-week course this summer in collaboration with Pangaea Expeditions, collecting samples for future research along the way.

“People need to be aware that we are the source of the problem, and because of this, we need to be part of the solution,” Mason said. “We all need to become aware of how much plastic we use in our lives and avoid using single-use products. Don’t buy water in plastic bottles or cosmetic products with micro beads. Bring re-usable bags to the store with you. Simple things like this make a big difference, but it’s also important to keep talking about this issue and raising awareness about how it affects the Great Lakes and the world’s oceans.”

It turns out that even this observant sailor has sailed right through garbage patches on the Atlantic Ocean and Great Lakes without noticing anything but the deep blue water that appears infinitely transparent. Now I realize what all the fuss is about. These new findings give me all the more reason to find ways to reduce, re-use, and recycle plastic at home and on my boat.

In short, I need to do my part to reduce plastic pollution in the world’s lakes and oceans.

Lisa Borre is a lake conservationist, freelance writer and sailor based in Annapolis, Maryland. With her husband, she co-founded LakeNet, a world lakes network, and co-wrote a sailing guide called “The Black Sea” based on their voyage around the sea in 2010. She is a native of the Great Lakes region and served as coordinator of the Lake Champlain Basin Program in the 1990s.